Toyota's Clever Solution To Make Teens Drive Safer Involves Blasting Their Parents' Embarrassing Music

"There's nothing teenagers fear more than being seen as uncool."

Toyota believes a little embarrassment goes a long way when it comes to teens. In an effort to make young people drive more responsibly, the brand has launched an app that encourages safer driving by keeping them off their smartphones

For Safe & Sound app to work, both parents and teens need to download it. After syncing their favorite songs, parents have the ability to send them the "virtual car keys" in the app, giving them permission to drive. The app activates the "Do Not Disturb" feature on a driver's phone which disables calls, messages, and social media notifications. It also pulls in Google Maps API to track how fast the driver is going. If that driver goes over the speed limit or tries to use his or her phone, the app will blast embarrassing songs from their parents' favorite playlists. 

All a teen has to do to get their parents' music to stop and their own to start up again is to slow down or get off their phones. Both parents and their kids can see a summary of the trip after it's over.

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The app is silly and fun, but it can also provide parents with a little peace of mind when their kids take the car. 

"To a teenage driver, the joy of the open road with music at your fingertips, whether alone or with your friends, is one of life's great experiences. For a parent, however, they can be uniquely stressful times," it says on the website for the app. "Research shows that one in five new drivers has a collision in their first year, with smartphones and speeding being the two main contributors to accidents. So, we set ourselves the challenge to maximize the parents' peace of mind while persuading their kids to take more care." 

The app is currently only available for Android smartphones, but hopefully the ad itself will help to raise awareness about the dangers of speeding. 

See how the app would play out for teens and their parents in the video below. 

(H/T: Adweek

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