When This Grieving Mom Requested Help On Reddit, The Internet Came To Her Aid

She asked for advice, but she got a whole lot more.

When Angela McElhiney's son Nathan died by suicide in October, a video she had of him singing at his Oklahoma high school became even more treasured. According to local publication The Daily Ardmoreite, Nathan was a devoted member of the school's drama club and in his spare time performed with community theater troupe Broadway Kids.

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Unfortunately, the original video had poor sound quality and lots of background noise, including people talking during his performance. So McElhiney took to the content sharing platform Reddit to see if anyone could give her advice on how to improve the video's sound. 

"It was such a bad recording and I just wanted to be able to hear him better," she told CNN of her song's rendition of "Wayfaring Stranger." "Right now, I feel like it's very therapeutic because I feel like it's the journey he's taking."

But instead of advice, McElhiney got an outpouring of support, love, and attempts at editing the video of her son. Sound engineers, musicians, and some people who didn't even know how to edit videos gave it a swing. McElhiney said she got more than 20 newly edited videos sent to her in private messages.

"I never expected so much kindness and so many people taking time out of their day," she said, according to CNN.

At first, McElhiney tried to respond to every comment with gratitude. Eventually, though, she said there were so many she couldn't keep up. 

With so much happening on the internet these days, from cyberbullying to harmful hoaxes,  it's nice to see people use it for good.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, you can reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK to speak with a skilled, trained counselor who is ready to listen to you.

At first, McElhiney tried to respond to every comment with gratitude. Eventually, though, she said there were so many she couldn't keep up. 

With so much happening on the internet these days, from cyberbullying to harmful hoaxes,  it's nice to see people use it for good.

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, you can reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK to speak with a skilled, trained counselor who is ready to listen to you.

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