Social Media Users Respond To The Idea That British Muslims 'Should Do More' To Stop Terror Attacks

"It’s not my fault. It’s not the fault of the religion."

ISIS has claimed responsibility for the May 22 terror attack at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England that took the lives of 22 people and injured dozens of others. Unfortunately, because of the attack's alleged ties to the Islamic State, it didn't take long for some people on social media to implore Muslims around the world to do more in an effort to identify extremists. 

Take, for example, Piers Morgan. Per Buzzfeed, the British journalist tweeted to Muslim actor Adil Ray just hours after the attack and told him, "The Muslim community can and should do more to root out extremists."

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Morgan later wrote a column for The Daily Mail in which he expounded upon that logic, writing, "It's not offensive or racist or bigoted or wrong to ask decent, law-abiding Muslims to do more to tackle this growing menace... there must be more Muslims can do as a community to spot these killers in their midst before they commit carnage."

He later added, "Frankly, I'm sick and tired of everyone treading on politically correct eggshells when it comes to this issue... And it's time for non-violent Muslims everywhere to step up their efforts to identify, isolate, expose, and name and shame those who are trying to drag Islam into a gutter of sickening unrelenting terror."

Though Morgan acknowledged many Muslims themselves are the victims of terror, social media users have suggested that his argument makes a lot of incorrect (and dangerous) assumptions about the Muslim community.

As one Twitter user pointed out, not all Muslims know each other, so it's not clear how "non-violent Muslims everywhere" could have intervened.

Singer Charlotte Church turned Morgan's thought process around, tweeting the following:

The general idea that people of a specific race, religion, or gender are responsible for the actions of their entire group is flawed because it fails to recognize people act independently of one another, regardless of their background. 

Buzzfeed notes that when a woman in the vicinity attack took to Twitter to give her condolences to those directly impacted, another user replied: "This is what happens when you let Muslims in your country."

The woman had the perfect response, which you can read below:

Anger in the aftermath of an attack like this is understandable, but blaming an entire religion for the senseless tragedy is not. 

The Guardian reports Muslim leaders in Manchester have already expressed concern about a number of Islamophobic incidents in the city. Mohammed Ullah, Muslim chaplain at University of Manchester, tells the publication he heard reports of a Muslim girl being spat at and another Muslim person being told to "go home." An arsonist also attacked a mosque in Oldham, Greater Manchester, shortly after the bombing.

"I say to Muslims you should not have to apologize for the actions of individuals," Ullah tells The Guardian. "No other community has ever been held to account like this... It's not my fault. It's not the fault of the religion."

Conversely, CNN reports about 50 imams and Muslim youth from around the U.K. drove to Manchester on May 23 to take part in a vigil in a display of solidarity after the attack.

"I as a Londoner experienced the same thing this great city of Manchester is experiencing," Zishan Ahmad, an imam at London's Baitul Futuh Mosque, told the outlet, referring to the March attack on Westminster Bridge. "For this reason I have come up here to show my support and convey the true message of Islam, which condemns such barbaric attacks."

Similarly, in the wake of the March attack, many Muslim women stood in solidarity with others on Westminster Bridge and condemned the violence. 

 "When an attack happens in London, it is an attack on me," Sarah Waseem, who participated in the gesture of solidarity, told the London-based newspaper The Independent at the time. "It is an attack on all of us."

Cover image via Shutterstock. / Susan Schmitz.

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